Category Archives: Wildlife animals

IRTA and CIBERNED sign an agreement to investigate prion diseases

Liebre ibérica. Juan Lacruz CC-BY

IRTA coordinates the group ‘MIXOlepus’ to face mixomatosis in the hare

Myxomatosis is a disease that mainly affected rabbits, but recent outbreaks have been detected in the Iberian hare for the first time. The working group ‘MIXOlepus’, coordinated by the researcher of the Animal Health Program of IRTA Ignacio Badiola and from the sub-program of endemic diseases, will study the disease with the aim of developing a vaccine.

Pigs and llamas are also susceptible to be infected by MERS-CoV

Citizen campaign to avoid African swine fever

The Government of Catalonia launches an information campaign aimed at the whole society with the aim of preventing the arrival of African Swine Fever (PPA) in Catalonia and detect it as soon as possible if there is some suspicious case.

Foto: Jacob González-Solís (UB-IRBio)

Pathogens scattered by humans in polar latitudes threaten Antarctic wildlife

Looking for porcine circovirus 3 in domestic pigs and wild boars.

Porcine Circovirus 3 (PCV-3) is a recently discovered virus belonging to the family Circoviridae. It represents the third porcine species of genus Circovirus, together with PCV-1, considered non-pathogenic, and PCV-2, one of the most economically relevant viruses for the pork industry.

African swine fever, frequently asked questions

What is the current status of the African Swine Fever virus? What is the resistance of the virus? What are its transmission routes? And the forms of infection? What can we do to prevent it? Dr. Llilianne Ganges, IRTA-CReSA researcher and OIE expert on Classical Swine Fever virus answers these questions.

African swine fever in Belgium. Don’t panic!

Today we had dinner over the sad news of the first case declared of African Swine fever in the South of Belgium. Just a few hours ago we learned that the virus causing this disease, the African Swine Fever virus (ASFv), had been diagnosed in two wild boars. In the absence of new data, everything is speculation. The most plausible explanations for the origin of these infections would be the direct infection of these animals by products contaminated with the virus from infected areas (“again the man is to blame”). Any other explanation would open rather uncomfortable questions to answer.